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1920s Swimwear + Journal!

Who doesn't love going to the beach in the summer?

I know, in this year of 2020, the idea of going to the beach can be fraught with anxiety, and with the need to stay physically distant, many beaches are closed. Thankfully, you can go to the beach with Ginger and be perfectly safe!

Swimwear was originally made out of wool in the early 1920s. However this wouldn't last for long, it was the roaring twenties after all! Wool was soon replaced with a more a swim-friendly ribbed jersey material, and modest high necklines were exchanged for V-necks. Of course, not everyone supported these new trends, and measures were taken to ensure public decency. In some places, police officers were known to patrol the beach measuring ladies' suits to ensure they weren't showing too much skin. Even so, the age of the modern swimsuit was not to be stopped, perhaps partly due to the creation of bathing beauty pageants.

 

So what did it take to be fashionable on a beach in the Jazz Age?

    • The swimsuit was the most important element of proper beach attire. In the early 20's many women wore a swim dress overtop longer shorts that were attached underneath. Some women dared to wear the slightly more risque two-piece unit, referred to as the Jantzen suit. The Jantzen resembled a tank top sewn to a pair of swim shorts that reached midway down the upper leg. These suits were often brightly colored and made of either jersey or cotton material.
    • For many, swim shoes (or beach boots) were a must. In the early '20s, beach boots were typically lace-up boots that reached just above the calf, but they eventually evolved into smaller more beach-friendly shoes made of Duck canvas.
    • Most women wore colorfully decorated swim caps to compliment their outfit and to protect their bobbed hair.

All images courtesy of vintagedancer.com

Follow Ginger and gang as they try to relax on the beach in

Murder at Brighton Beach.

 

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Murder's a Beach!

Seaside at Brighton, a family holiday turns deadly. After Ginger and Basil and their family check into a Brighton hotel on a lovely warm day in June of 1926, a shocking discovery upsets their plans to relax in the sun.

Not only will Ginger not finish her book, she might not get out alive.

★★★★★

 

Join Mrs. Ginger Reed~aka Lady Gold, her adventurous sister-in-law Felicia, and her curious dog Boss, as they take these new challenging puzzles. Lady Gold Investigates Volume Two presents The Case of the Recipe Robbery and The Case of the Museum Burglary. 

A companion series to Ginger Gold Mysteries, each volume is approximately 20 thousand words or 95 pages. A bite-size read perfect for a transit commute home, time spent waiting at an appointment, or to settle into sleep at night. Get your coffee, tea, or glass of wine and snuggle in!

*****

New Journal Entry

We are entering the war years! Keep reading the journal to find out how Ginger ends up becoming part of the secret service. If you're not following and you'd like to, the Journal is available to my newsletter subscribers. You can subscribe HERE.

*****

Now Available in Audio

Mayhem All Aboard!

One blustery day in October of 1924, newlyweds Mr. and Mrs. Basil Reed travel aboard the recently christened Flying Scotsman, a high-speed steam engine train that travels from London to Edinburgh, for their honeymoon. With only one short stop at York, Ginger anticipates time with her new husband will fly by.

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